Tags

, , , , , , ,

A new study looked at how people make financial decisions, and found that people tended to reject offers that their guts told them were unfair, even if they stood to benefit from them. “‘Humans are highly attuned to unfairness and we are sometimes required to weigh up the demands of maintaining justice with preserving our own economic self-interest,’ study researcher Barney Dunn of the University of Exeter, said in a statement.”

While this research is an interesting insight into human conceptions of fairness, the part that really caught my eye was the following:

The researchers say that evidence is mounting to indicate that our bodies can sometimes govern how we think and feel, rather than the other way round. It also reveals that those people who are more in tune with their bodies are more likely to be led by their ‘gut feelings’.

“This research supports the idea that what happens in our bodies can sometimes shape how we think and feel in our minds,” Dunn said. “Everyday phrases like ‘following your heart’ and ‘trusting your gut’ can often, it seems, be accurate.”

To put it bluntly: well, duh. I love looking at scientific studies that support the work I do, but I’m often entertained when it makes me think, “Did I really need science to tell me that?”

Probably my favorite part is this, where the report uses language I’m very familiar with to talk about study participants’ ability to follow their gut:

Those people who showed a bigger physical response to unfair offers were more likely to reject them, but this was only the case if individuals were also able to accurately ‘listen’ to what their bodies were telling them.

You heard it here first, folks: notice your physical reactions, listen to the wisdom of your body, and decision-making becomes a whole lot clearer.  In my training, we used to call this not an ‘aha’ moment, as Ilana had it, but a ‘duh-huh’ moment.

Advertisements