The stories we tell ourselves

A few days ago, I came across a fantastic post about narrative, and how easy it is, given that we’re narrative creatures with storytelling in our DNA, to tell the same stories over and over about things, even when they aren’t true. The title of the post is “‘We Have Always Fought’: Challenging the ‘Women,Continue reading “The stories we tell ourselves”

Childhood, consent, and learning to be human

What imprints do we receive as children?  When you were five, or six, or seven, what messages really stuck and taught you how people ought to treat each other, how you deserved to be treated, and what options you had for interaction with others? I know for my part, I was teased a lot asContinue reading “Childhood, consent, and learning to be human”

How touching saves lives

I stumbled across this beautiful article today, by Dr. Alex Lickerman, a Buddhist physician.  He tells the story of an ER patient who was so terrified of needles that the prospect of having her blood drawn had her shaking, rigid, and in tears.  Not knowing what else to do, the doctor took her hand, whichContinue reading “How touching saves lives”

[Re-run] When will it be safe to be a girl?

This week I stumbled across two posts about gender that really resonated with me.  Gender is a tangled and complex subject, and there are people who can speak far more eloquently about trans issues, the intersection of gender and sexuality, and breaking the gender mold than I can.  But I wanted to highlight these twoContinue reading “[Re-run] When will it be safe to be a girl?”

“Sometimes we save each other”

Since it seems to be Radiolab week or something at this here blog, and since I’m running about a bit with a wonderful houseguest, today I give you yet another link from those good folks: the story of the spider on the frog on the turtle.  (There’s pictures, too.) (In fact, even if you don’tContinue reading ““Sometimes we save each other””

Touch at a distance

Jumping off of Radiolab for the second time this week (as I’ve been listening to it rather obsessively), I’m meditating today on the concepts of sound and touch – both of which are essential to Rubenfeld Synergy Method – and learning that they are more powerfully related than one might think. Ilana Rubenfeld, the founderContinue reading “Touch at a distance”

The Bus To Now

Happy New Year, everyone. I’ve been out of contact for some time, as the holidays were especially rich this year. This year, I’m hoping to have something new for you every Monday, Wednesday and Friday; I hope you’ll stick around. Last night, as I was driving back from my parents’ place in New Jersey, IContinue reading “The Bus To Now”

When will it be safe to be a girl?

This week I stumbled across two posts about gender that really resonated with me.  Gender is a tangled and complex subject, and there are people who can speak far more eloquently about trans issues, the intersection of gender and sexuality, and breaking the gender mold than I can.  But I wanted to highlight these twoContinue reading “When will it be safe to be a girl?”

“I thought I could drown all my sorrows. But I found out my sorrows could swim.”

The above quotation, from a man in Guatemala who had his wife and children killed during the civil war there, broke my heart while I was driving today – perhaps especially because it was in translation from Spanish, and I was moved by how such a cliche about grief could be transformed with an unexpectedContinue reading ““I thought I could drown all my sorrows. But I found out my sorrows could swim.””

Friday Favorites – Humility, Picaresqueness, Queer Narratives, and Balloons Goslings

Here’s my roundup of stuff I enjoyed this week in the ol’ blogosphere. First, hovercraftdoggy per usual brings me all the pictorial love: Scott Williams writes about humility and its crucial role in relationships: “I have come to understand that my personal self-worth, happiness, and completeness cannot be based on another fallible person. I haveContinue reading “Friday Favorites – Humility, Picaresqueness, Queer Narratives, and Balloons Goslings”